Threatened taxa of Kerala

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Scientific name: Lepidopygopsis typus Raj, 1941. It is commonly called as Periyar trout. In local parlance it is called as Brahmana Kanda. The species was first described by Raj SB, in 1941 from Periyar lake. This is an endemic fish confined to the Periyar streams above the Mullaperiyar lake and has considerable zoogeographical importance. The members of Schizothoracinae are found only in the Himalayan region. The species in  Periyar is considered as a relic population of a erstwhile widely distributed one.
Scientific name: Gonoproktopterus periyarensis Raj, 1941. The local people call it Kariyan due to the slate colour of the body. Periyar barb (English) Kariyan (Malayalam). This species is known from Kallar river, tributary of Pambiyar river to south of Pachakanam estate adjoining to Periyar lake
Scientific name: Garra hughi Silas, 1955. Commonly known as the Cardamona garra due to its discover from the High ranges. It is adapted to the fast flowing regime of the stream with low water temperature. Heavy soil erosion, pollution and increased     pesticide level in the habitat resulted in the decline of the population.
Scientific name: Tor khudree  Sykes. It is known as Deccan mahseer (English) Kuyil or Katti (Malayalam). Its ranges extends the entire Peninsular India. Habitat alteration, pollution, sand mining, over exploitation, fish poisoning, alien invasive fish species, dynamiting and electrocution are the major threats identified.
According to IUCN, its status is endangered.
Scientific name: Vijayachelys silvatica (Henderson, 1912)
Common Name: Cochin Forest Cane turtle (English); Chooralama, Kavalama  (Malayalam)
In Chalakudy, Kerala, South India. This is a poorly known species, endemic to the Western Ghats of Southern India. Pet trade, very low range of distribution, Habitat destruction are the major threat to the species. According to IUCN, its status is Endangered.
Scientific name: Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758). Commonly called as Green turtle in English and Kadalama in Malayalam. Flesh and Egg is edible. The green turtle is a circumglobal species with foraging and nesting occurring throughout the tropics. Chelonia mydas is found throughout the Indian River Lagoon. Shrimp trawlers in particular cause the majority of incidental deaths of sea turtles.  As per IUCN, its status is endangered. A comprehensive study on the ecology and breeding biology is required to support the conservation measures.
Scientific name: Varanus bengalensis Daudin, 1802. Known as Bengal Monitor lizard in English and Udumbu in Malayalam. The flesh is said to have medicinal value. The greatest threat to this species is hunting as it is hunted commercially for its skin, and its meat is commonly eaten. The fat is also used in traditional medicine. However, IUCN included it in Least Concern category.
Scientific name: Rhacophorus lateralis Boulenger, 1883. This species is restricted to two small areas of the southern Western Ghats of India in Kerala (Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary and its surroundings) and Karnataka (Coorg and its surroundings) at an elevation of approximately 800m asl. It might occur a little more widely than current records suggest. It is threatened by the conversion of forest areas to cultivated land (including timber and non-timber plantations). IUCN has listed in the endangered category.
Scientific name: Bos gaurus C.H. Smith, 1827. Known as Guar or Indian Bison in English and Kattupothu in Malayalam. Poaching, loss and alteration of the habitat, competition with the domestic cattle, diseases, etc. IUCN has listed in the Vulnerable category.
Scientific name: Platacanthomys lasiurus Blyth 1859. It is known as Malabar Spiny Dormouse, Malabar Spiny Tree Mouse, Spiny Tree Mouse. This species is endemic to Western Ghats of India ranging from Shivamogge, Karnataka in the north to Peppara Wildlife Sanctuary in Thiruvananthapuram district. Habitat loss, changes in land use are major threats to the species. It is very sensitive to change in quality of habitat and to human interference. In some areas of its occurrence it is threatened due to harvest for medicinal purpose.
Scientific name: Pachliopta hector (Linnaeus, 1758). Its common name in English is Crimson Rose. It is stated to be endemic to Sri Lanka and southern India, but its range may extend along the east coast of Orissa, south Bihar, West Bengal and into Sikkim and parts of northeast India. Deforestation, land use change, pollution and illegalt trade.
Scientific name: Hypolimnas misippuz (Linnaeus). Commonly known as Danaid Eggfly. Loss and alteration of the habitiat, pollution, pesticide, fungicide and weedicide application, industrial pollution, etc. are the threats to the species. It is Included in the Wildlife Protection Act (1972) Schedule 1.
Scientific name: Lissemys punctata (Lacépède, 1788). It is commonly known as Indian Flap-shelled Turtle, Indian Flapshell Turtle. It is exploited for flesh, carapace and plastron. Over exploitation, Loss and alteration of the habitiat, pollution, pesticide, fungicide and weedicide application, industrial pollution are the threats.  It is included in the Wildlife Protection Act (1972) Schedule 1 and the IUCN listed in the lower Risk category.
Glyptopetalum grandiflorum Bedd.
Family               : Celastraceae
Habit                 : Small tree
Habitat: Evergreen forests
Distribution      : So far known only from the windward evergreen forests in the Wayanad and Kannur region of Southern Western Ghats
IUCN status    : Endangered
Humboldtia unijuga Bedd. Family: Caesalpiniaceae
Habit: Small tree
Habitat: Evergreen forest
Distribution: So far known only from the middle elevation evergreen forests in the Agasthyamalai phytogeographical region of southern Western Ghats
IUCN status: Endangered
Polyalthia shendurunii Basha & Sasidh.
Family: Annonaceae
Habit: Tall tree
Habitat: Evergreen forests
World distribution: So far known only from the evergreen forests of Agasthyamalai phytogeographical region of southern Western Ghats
IUCN status: Endangered
Scientific name: Ceropegia decaisneana Wight
Common name: Palaancheera (Malayalam)
Description: Herbaceous tuberous twiners in low altitude rocky grassland areas
Economic value: Leaves edible, others not known
Distribution: Western Ghats
Endemism: Endemic to southern Western Ghats
Threat to the species: Habitat disturbances
Scientific name: Goniothalamus wynaadensis (Bedd.) Bedd.
Description: Third storey undergrowth in evergreen forests
Distribution: Southern Western Ghats
Endemism: Endemic to windward region of Nilgiri phytogeographical region of Southern Western Ghats
Threat to the species: Habitat disturbances
Scientific name    : Ixora lawsonii Gamble
Description: Sub-shrub in shola forests
Economic value    : Not known
Distribution: Southern Western Ghats
Endemism: Endemic to windward region of Nilgiri  phytogeographical region of Southern Western    Ghats
Threat to the species: Habitat disturbances
Scientific name    : Miliusa nilagirica Bedd.
Description: Shrubs in evergreen forests at higher altitutdes
Economic value    : Not known
Distribution: Southern Western Ghats
Endemism: Endemic to Windward region of Nilgiri phytogeographical region of Southern Western Ghats
Threat to the species: Habitat disturbances
Scientific name    : Trias stocksii Benth. ex Hook. f.
Description: Epiphyte in evergreen and semi-evergreen forests
Distribution: Southern Western Ghats
Endemism: Endemic to Southern Western Ghats
Threat to the species: Habitat disturbances
Elephas maximus Linnaeus, 1758 Asian Eelphant  (Endangered)
Ophiophagus hannah (Cantor, 1836) Hamadryad, King Cobra (Vulnerable)
Buceros bicornis Linnaeus, 1758  Great Hornbill (Near Threatened)

 

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